PAUL  KLEIN  Writes    

FROM AN INTERVIEW WITH AUTHOR PAUL KLEIN:

Q: “How do you write? Where do the words come from?”

A: “I’ve been asked that one a lot of times! The words just come. They just do. That is what the writing life is all about: putting words to ideas to share with others. Of course most of us do that automatically whenever we have a conversation. Writing, as a way of life, is a bit more complicated.”

Q: “How did you get started as a writer?”

A: “My introduction to the world of creative expression actually began when I was very young. I loved being read to, but couldn’t wait to begin reading myself. When I was twelve or so, a young couple who had moved to our town started a Sunday afternoon radio workshop for young people. I had long been fascinated by radio (television was still just a promise - that dates me, doesn’t it?), and when I joined the workshop I began to learn the rudiments of acting with my voice, and even directed one or two of the plays we recorded and which were broadcast locally. I was hooked! In the process, by reading and acting scripts which had been done by some of radio’s best known writers, I learned some of the basics of scriptwriting.

Q: “So - where did that take you?”

A: “Beginning in high school and then on through my college years and even for a short time after graduation, I found work as an announcer in radio and TV stations. But I soon realized that radio, the kind of radio I grew up with, was no longer viable. The summer before I graduated from university, I had sold my first two scripts. Wow - that was exciting! I now felt that writing was where my life would be.”

Q: “And then?”

A: “I began a real apprenticeship, working first as a carpenter on film sets. and then as an assistant to the cameraman and the editor in a film studio (in my last year of college.) Then at last: a real job with a major in-house production unit! And this led to a three-year stint writing a television documentary series that was syndicated nation-wide,. From there, similar assignments as both a staff writer and a freelance. All of those films (perhaps 700 produced over the next several decades) were for someone else. I loved writing them, producing them, immersing myself in the writing and production processes, but they were for others, not for me. Finally, when I didn’t have to depend on clients and staff positions, I decided the time had come to write for me, and by extension, for you.”


 Q:  "What about your work to date? You have three books

 featured now on your website."

 A:    "The books featured on the web site are what I have published so far . There are others  I have written, and am working on: short stories, essays, and a novel that I want to rewrite one more time. I’m working to give them all life and light. I love writing. I feel an internal need at times to write that can’t be denied. I write stories in my head when I’m falling asleep or walking in the woods. Almost everything I see or hear or do triggers a story idea. That will continue I hope, until I have shared them all.

But I still don’t really fully understand where the words come from! I guess that is what it means to be a writer!"

Q:   "Thank you."

A:  "It’s MY pleasure!"


If you would like to arrange for Paul to do a book reading/signing for your organization, library,  or for your reading group,  contact him at:   pkwrites@gmailcom

WhenI was very young I wanted to be

an architect, live on a farm, and own a

radio station. When I grew up I studied

architecture, became a film writer, and

retired to a farm. Overall, not bad.

I have designed and built houses

(including the one we live in), had sheep

and chickens in the dooryard, and

written and produced more than 500

films about industry, labor, agriculture,

religion, history, politics, medicine, art

and travel. And then I retired.

(One of the essays in "Mixed Freight" defines retired as "being tired again").

For most of the last twenty years I have been learning the craft of writing without pictures: essays, short stories and novels.

In 2007, my first novel was published: "Accidents of Time and Place."

In it, I examine what it takes to be a hero in a world of war and personal politics - - as seen in the 1950s. The war story, the political story, are the framework for examining a young man who simply follows the path life shows him, and by being in the right (or wrong, depending on your point of view) place, becomes that most misunderstood of characters: a hero. How he handles it is what made the story interesting to me, and one I wanted to tell.

"Mixed Freight: Checking Life's Baggage," is a collection of essays (some previously published) that reflect my very personal views about society, government, economics, the natural world and religion. My own film-of-memory without the pictures. The result, perhaps, of three-quarters of a century of observing and describing my world. Come, let me share it with you!

                                                                                          Sincerely,  Paul